Monday, October 11, 2010

Actual Consequences of Promoting Myths

As a follow up to the Myth or Reality? post, these two bits of feedback show real-world consequences of vegan myths:

In response to Jack's Vegan Nutrition – What Does the Science Say?, Lisa writes:

Thanks for the video. I agree about the protein issue. I was a victim of that belief for more than a year after my husband and I became vegan. One of the first books that I have read about the topic talked about how elephants and other big animals are herbivores. So we don’t really need to worry about protein. And I didn’t. We cut out meat and other animal products from our diet and didn’t bother to substitute with plant foods that are rich in protein. I started having noticeable negative health effects, including hair loss. And since I strongly believed that I had the healthiest diet ever, I didn’t want to make the connection that something was wrong with what I was eating. Or rather not eating. Anyways, long story short, reading the book Becoming Vegan saved us. And now I think that that should be the first book that all new vegans read. It can help avoid so many mistakes that are common among new and not so new vegans. Or alternatively, familiarizing yourself with the contents of veganhealth.org can also help avoid those common pitfalls.

And after seeing Jack's Homocysteine Update, gmacv shares:

I wish I had read this months ago! I went through hell this past summer, thinking I had MS. Fortunately, my symptoms turned out to be a result of a “slight” B12 deficiency. I am living proof that this is no joke. Fortunately, my B12 levels are now well into the normal range and my symptoms have disappeared. Thank you for spreading the word.

These folks stuck with their compassionate diet until they were fortunate enough to find a way to fix their troubles. But many, if not most new vegans in similar situations wouldn't stay vegan (and some will dedicate themselves to bashing veganism). This is just another reason we need to be knowledgeable and honest -- with ourselves and others.

-Matt
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